Sunday, 20 November 2016

Labrynth

Well, yesterday Judy and I created our labyrinth together.   Well actually, Judy did most of the work. She has been longing to do this for 20-30 years, but yesterday her dream came true.
Thankfully our fencing contractor was able to move 2500 lbs of Mexican White Beach Stones down from the road at the front of the house, by using a skid steer... and also moved 45 bags of Red Canadian Cedar Mulch too! It saved us hours of work.

So here are a few sequential photos of work in progress until its completion.
We began with a template membrane which we stapled to the ground in strategic places and then placed the rocks on the lines.... lifting 50lb bags of stones at a time!
Then placed the Red Cedar mulch between the lines... gorgeous scent and soft under foot.







And now today, of course, we have 5 inches of snow covering everything!
Misty's orange tennis ball was carefully placed by her last thing...
Nicholas

Tuesday, 15 November 2016

Supermoon....

On Sunday night I spotted the supermoon coming up slowly in the East as I was driving back with Misty from the Pet Playhouse near Caroline.. It was bright enough to shine through the skeletal shapes of the trees on the hills.
Later I photographed it high in the sky above us...


A few days earlier we had a gorgeous sunrise which lit up the last of the fall colors like a beacon.

Judy has planted about 40 garlic bulbs which, all things being equal will provide us with a splendid resource next year.
Tomorrow our additional garden fencing is to be set which will allow us to build our labyrinth in the annex. 45 bags of white Mexican beach stones are on their way across the country from Washington state and will arrive next week.
Nicholas

Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Fall Colors

The fall colors this year have been amazing: deep reds and golds in the hills...
We had thought that the drought would have meant a very lean fall, but we've been delightfully surprised. 
Here is a panorama of Hammond Hill taken from our patio.


And here is a shot of a dramatic sky and a beautiful tree to our West...


Meanwhile, we hope to install our labrynth in the garden soon and also to extend the fencing on the gallery side of the house to give a larger play area for Misty and for Judy to be able to have some potager style raised beds...
Nicholas

Tuesday, 27 September 2016

Autumnal Sparkle...

The field behind our house is slowly fading into its autumnal colors, but this morning there were some spectacular spider webs glistening with dew.



And, some elegant Queen Anne's lace heads...


There is a definite chill to the morning air these days just past equinox and soon, even, we might anticipate a frost.
Hundreds of butterflies flutter over the wild flowers. There are so many more this year and are a wonderful sight.
Nicholas

Friday, 23 September 2016

Wild Clouds...

The other evening we we're treated to the sight of some wild, beautiful clouds which were backlit by a setting sun. Changing shapes slowly they were a stunning sight.



Now, just after the fall equinox, we are still in a blast of warm air, but, there's cool on the way this weekend.
Nicholas

Monday, 15 August 2016

Farmers Market

It is always a delight to go to Ithaca Farmers Market in the summer. With produce sourced from local farms within a twenty mile radius, the range of vegetables and fruits is astonishing.







While we were supping apple cider by the lake, we spotted a cormorant sunning itself on a log...
Nicholas

Thursday, 11 August 2016

Evening Primrose

We've been blessed with a profuse display of Evening Primrose (Oenothera) plants this year at the end of the garden...and one of the benefits of these lovely plants is that they enrich the soil with Gamma Linoleum Acid, an oil which promotes health.
Oenothera flowers are pollinated by insects, such as moths and bees. Like many other members of the Onagraceae, however, the pollen grains are loosely held together by viscin threads, so only insects that are morphologically specialized to gather this pollen can effectively pollinate the flowers. Bees with typical scopa cannot hold it. Also, the flowers open at a time when most bee species are inactive, so the bees which visit Oenothera are generally vespertine temporal specialists: bees that forage in the evening. The seeds ripen from late summer to fall.




Today, the humidity is incredible and being outside for a few moments brings sweat to the brow!

Nicholas